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Thais taking Cannabis to Japan will face punishment

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Thais taking Cannabis to Japan will face punishment
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Thai nationals heading to Japan should avoid taking cannabis, hemp, and cannabis-related products and could face being arrested under Japanese laws, according to the Thai embassy in Japan.

“The Thai embassy in Tokyo would like to warn Thai people not to bring in cannabis, hemp or products containing these plants into Japan. Violators could face punishment under the Japanese law.”

Possession of cannabis and hemp for import or export purposes in Japan is penalised by a maximum 7 year prison sentence.

Having cannabis for sale, or trafficking cannabis products, can lead to 10 years behind bars. Those responsible will also have to pay a fine of up to ¥3 million… around 786,000 Thai Baht.

The cannabis plant has been taken off Thailand’s Category 5 narcotics list in a June 9 announcement that’s seen a surge of cannabis use and shops opening up openly flouting earlier laws, despite no specific restrictions or laws being presented to the Thai parliament at this time. Thailand is the first time country in south east Asia to decriminalise the herbal drug.

In order to restrict access to marijuana and hemp, people have to be at least 20 years of age as the Thai government, and departments, start to clarify the recent announcement.

But a stint in jail is still better than the potential fate facing anyone taking cannabis products into Indonesia.

Last week, the Royal Thai Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, cautioned Thai people against taking cannabis and hemp into Indonesia as they could face the death penalty under existing laws.

The official Facebook page of the Royal Thai Embassy in Jakarta today uploaded a picture with a message saying, “The Royal Thai Embassy in Jakarta would like to warn Thai people not to carry cannabis, hemp or products with cannabis or hemp ingredients into Indonesia.”

Cannabis in Singapore is currently illegal for recreational purposes, but medicinal purposes has been allowed under “extraordinary circumstances” in recent years. Possession or consumption can result in a maximum of 10 years in prison, with a possible fine of S$20,000, as well as caning, under the Misuse of Drugs Act.

Cannabis in Malaysia is legal for medical purposes. Recreational use of cannabis under Malaysian legislation provides for a mandatory death penalty for convicted drug traffickers. Individuals arrested in possession of 200 grams (seven ounces) of marijuana are presumed by law to be trafficking in drugs.

In line with many south-east Asian countries, possession, distribution and production of marijuana is officially illegal in Vietnam, with harsh penalties on the books for contravention of the law. Medical marijuana is also not legal.

Credit สถานเอกอัครราชทูต ณ กรุงโตเกียว ประเทศญี่ปุ่น – 在東京タイ王国大使館

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

 

Courtesy ofThaiger News

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